The Internet Poetry Archive

Sonnet 18

William Shakespeare


Easily one of Shakespeare's best known and most beloved of his poems,
Sonnet 18 brilliantly and succinctly intertwines metaphor around weather
and how the passage of time might affects a beautiful lover.
This work holds deep meaning for many who read it.


Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date:
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimm'd;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimm'd;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st;
Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou grow'st;
So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

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